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Part of Your Separation & Divorce Team: Career Coaches
Part of Your Separation & Divorce Team: Career Coaches

A similar post on careers after a divorce or separation was originally published on Jennifer Reynold’s Fresh Legal – Family Law Blog in January 2015. Jennifer uses a collaborative approach to family law and she works closely with a team of professionals who can help clients dealing with various aspects of family matters.

 

Many people feel the need to re-evaluate employment options in the medium to long term after a separation or divorce, to offset expenses associated with a new family structure, reduced household income, and possibly support obligations. In this post, I provide information about how I can help people in such situations. (I’ve also written about the impact of divorce on one’s behaviour at work, and dealing with other difficult personal matters while trying to work).

Career Planning Diagram

What can a career coach do for me?

When life throws a big curveball, you want someone skilled and objective on your team who can help you make the best of your skills, interests, and precious time to ensure a resilient and satisfying livelihood. With me, “it’s more than career coaching, it’s career psychology.” My approach and outcomes are different because my foundation is different.

A skilled career coach can help you with:

  • Identifying a career path that will be engaging and satisfying
  • Framing your skills and experience effectively by using your
    • Resume and LinkedIn profile
    • Cover letters
    • Job interviews (especially customized practice interviews)
  • Narrowing the gaps between your current job and your target / ideal job
  • Networking to discover hidden employment opportunities
  • Career transitioning/returning to work after being a full-time parent
  • Striking a sustainable balance between working and single-parenting / co-parenting
  • Self-employment options

Thinking of a career upgrade after separation?

During the early days/months, a sensible and balanced approach might include taking on personal and career development as a cost-neutral or low-cost pastime. For example, consider taking MOOCs (massive online open courses) or reading up on topics/trends in your professional field. When done strategically and effectively, this will put you ahead and position you towards improved career options.

Carefully consider the pros and cons associated with taking a promotion within your current organization or a new organization. Often, positions that are more specialized rather than managerial offer a meaningful bump in pay without the (sometimes) time-consuming HR responsibilities that go along with typical management positions.

If you’ve got the flexibility to pursue it, you should embrace networking both on and offline; it will definitely pay dividends. I’ve written other blog posts on the benefits of networking in person, one of which can be found here.

If you’ve got questions or comments related to this post, I’d love to hear from you by email, phoneTwitter, on Facebook, or LinkedIn.

 

More than career coaching, it’s career psychology®.

 

I/O Advisory Services – Building Resilient Careers and Organizations.™

 

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