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Something Isn’t Right at Work … Is it the Venue or the Vocation?
Something Isn’t Right at Work … Is it the Venue or the Vocation?

Bored-at-WorkMost people experience better and worse days at work. When the bad days start to outnumber the good days, then it might be time to re-evaluate.

A good starting point is to identify what exactly is contributing to your sense of unhappiness or dissatisfaction at work. Are you experiencing too much friction and conflict with your co-workers and or boss? Is it a toxic work environment? Are you dealing with the consequences of workplace bullying or sexual harassment? Do you believe that there’s no real chance for a meaningful promotion? Bored by tasks and responsibilities that fall below your abilities? Underpaid? These types of complaints don’t really reflect your actual career choice or vocation. If these are the types of things that are bothering you at work – over the longer term (i.e., months and months) – then it’s probably worth considering a change in venue … in other words, you might be better off working somewhere else.

If, however, you keep experiencing the same problems at work even after you’ve changed jobs a couple of times or more, then it may be worth considering a change in your career or vocation. It’s pretty tough to be performing at your full potential when you’re chronically dissatisfied and/or disengaged at work. A change in a career that better suits your skills, abilities, and interests will set you up in a way that creates more opportunity for success. Other factors worth considering when trying to figure out if your work dissatisfaction is enough to trigger a job or career change are discussed in this fall 2017 UpFront Ottawa article called Four Signs That You Need a Career Change.

 

Need help dealing with a delicate or high-stakes career or HR issue? I invite you to contact me privately. I offer a free 15 to 20-minute initial consultation by phone. Or, if you prefer, you can contact me by email, or via direct message on TwitterFacebook, or LinkedIn.

 

More than career coaching, it’s career psychology®.

 

I/O Advisory Services – Building Resilient Careers and Organizations.™

 

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