fbpx
Using I-O Psychology For Better Hiring
Using I-O Psychology For Better Hiring

i-o psychology members, SIOPI’ve often heard the expression “people are too quick to hire and too slow to fire …” but in practice, most hiring still remains way too quick. Given what’s at stake I’m surprised. This does, however, provide a chance to put the power of Industrial / Organizational or I-O Psychology — sometimes called work or business psychology — to good use.

 

Hidden Costs of a Bad Hire

When you drill down and think about the costs associated with making a bad hiring decision, it’s easy to see how those costs add up. For example, there’s the time lost on recruiting and training another employee, the negative impact on employee morale, and fewer sales / lower productivity.

 

using i-o psychology for hiring

 

There are also operational consequences of making a bad hiring decision. For example, there may be low quality work. If your new employee delivers poor customer service then this will be counterproductive if it prevents repeat business.

In addition, when you factor in the time spent screening applicants, interviewing them, preparing a letter of offer, training/onboarding, etc. it can easily cost $25,000 or more depending on the salary of the staff involved in the hiring process (and the salary of the new employee).

How Do You Make Sure You Get Good Value for Your Money?

 

When hiring staff, it’s rare that anyone forgets to assess knowledge. For instance, if you’re hiring an engineer or accountant, you confirm that they have the appropriate credentials. But let’s face it, in practice; the core knowledge possessed by two people with similar credentials is not what separates them. Normally, what distinguishes between two people who look similar on paper is how they apply their knowledge. Do they have similar judgment? Are they able to explain things to their colleagues and clients? Are they pleasant to work with or do they alienate others? These are important questions but why do so many people forget to assess behaviours  (aka soft skills) – or do it poorly?

 

 

using i-o psychology for better hiring via job interview

As a specialist in I-O psychology, I have expertise in assessing human behaviour within the context of work. I use techniques from I-O Psychology as part of the hiring process. This means that I can help you to identify the key behaviours that your next hire should excel at – then I can help you to evaluate it during the hiring process.

 

Interested in learning more about how to make better hiring decisions? Sign up for an upcoming Lunch & Learn session in Ottawa on February 17th, 2016.

 

 

In the meantime, if you’re interested in next level Career Coaching or HR Services I invite you to contact me by email, phone, or via direct message on Twitter,  Facebook, or LinkedIn. Phone and video appointments are also available.

 

More than career coaching, it’s career psychology®.

 

I/O Advisory Services– Building Resilient Careers and Organizations.™

 

Easily share this article using any of the social media icons below.

Latest Posts

Overcoming Nerves in a Job Interview

Overcoming Nerves in a Job Interview

There’s no doubt about it — a job interview is a nerve-wracking experience! It’s natural to feel nervous before a job interview. After all, it’s an important event with the potential to shape your future, and you are on the hot seat. But it’s important to remember that almost everyone feels nerves at some point before an interview. It’s a sign that you care about the opportunity and want to do your best.

Returning to IRL networking?

Returning to IRL networking?

Anyone who’s ever been to an in-person networking event knows that they can be, well, a little awkward. As we re-adjust to in-person interactions after such a long time, things may feel even more awkward than usual. Standing around with a bunch of strangers, trying to make small talk and exchange business cards – it can feel like a lot of pressure to make a good impression.

How to Stand Out in an Interview: Part Two

How to Stand Out in an Interview: Part Two

In my last blog How to Stand Out in an Interview: Part One, I wrote about some of the ways to answer the interview question, “Why are you the best candidate for this job.” In Part Two I’ll explain how to really make your answer stand out. Hiring managers want to know why you’re the right person for their organization. Give them what they want!

How to Stand Out in an Interview: Part One

How to Stand Out in an Interview: Part One

The interview is going so well. Your answers are flowing naturally; you feel like you’re nailing it; the job is yours for sure. You feel it starting to wind down, and you know what’s coming next. “Why should we hire you? Why do you think you’re the best candidate for this job?”